Monday, 14 July 2014

A 70s-tastic Anna with a gathered skirt and patch pockets

I think this is one of my favourite makes ever.  It's the By Hand London Anna bodice with a gathered skirt.



Now, there have been many Annas with gathered skirts, Roisin made two (here and here), but mine was inspired by this one by Amy from Sylkotwist.  I have previously shamelessly copied Amy here, and it was the patch pockets on her dress that did the trick this time.


I think the main reason that I love this dress so much is the fabric.  I bought this in the Christmas sales from The Village Haberdashery website.  It's Anna Maria Horner fabric, and the design is Hand Drawn Garden Deep Nouveau Bouquet.  I've just found it here at Plush Addict.  It was originally £12 per metre, and I got 3 metres for £5.50 per metre. 


I have spoken before of my love for big, mad, 70s style prints, and I know they are not to everybodys' taste, but I love them.  If it makes me think, "oh, my retinas!" then I want it!  Also, this dress was really easy to make, which is always pleasing.


I absolutely loved the colours in this, especially the turquoise green.  I know I made a lot of things with red fabric; and as much as I like red, I like green and purple more.  I think it's just easier to find red fabric.  I have one more piece of red fabric to use, and then there will be a temporary red-fabric-buying ban!


There really are patch pockets on the skirt, they are just a bit tricky to spot on the print.  I've done a how-to on how I made them at the bottom of this post.


In other news, my Sew Dolly Clacket winning fabric Belladone dress is nearly finished.  I hoped to finished it yesterday, and would have done if it hadn't been for the pesky zip!  If you recall, I wanted to use an exposed zip in it, but it turned out that I had bought a separating zip, and not a closed end zip.  So now I'm impatiently waiting for a zip I ordered on ebay last night. 



Patch Pockets

Here's how I made my patch pockets.  I will add my usual disclaimer of not being an expert, and the main point of my how-tos is for me to remember how I ever did something.

The photo below looks a lot scarier than it really is.

 

Cut out a square of paper measuring 15cm by 15cm.

Rule in the Seam Allowances at 1.5cm.  Mine are purple.

Rule a line vertical line down the centre, 7.5cm from each edge.  Mine is pink.

Along this line, measure 4cm down from one Seam Allowance line.  This is the black line between the two red circles.

Parallel to this line, measure 2cm down from each of the edge Seam Allowance lines.  This is the black line between the two pink circles. 

Rule a diagonal line between the lower red and pink circles, extending it out to the edge of the paper.  Mine is green.  Do the same on the other side. 

You will then have this:


Cut along the diagonal lines, so it looks like this:


Add a 1.5cm Seam Allowance to the diagonal edge on the smaller piece, and this is the pattern piece for the pocket top.  The straight edges are parallel to the grainline.


Cut out another 15cm by 15cm square, and this is the pocket pattern piece.  Again the straight edges are parallel to the grainline.


Cut out two of each piece in your fabric.  Snip through the point of the pocket top, just inside the seam allowance.  This will help to fold the seam allowance under.


Fold the seam allowance (1.5cm) under to the wrong side, and press.


Pin the pocket flap to one edge of the pocket, lining the edges up.  The pocket flap and the pocket are both wrong side up.  Sew this edge together across the top edge.


Press the seam allowance down towards the pocket on the pocket right side.  Trim the seam allowance to 1/4 inch.


Press the pocket flap down on top of the pocket.
 

Top stitch across the top edge, and also the diagonal edges of the pocket piece at 1/4 inch from the edge.  (Sorry about the blurry photo!)


With the wrong side up, press the side edges of the pocket in by 1.5cm.


This is a clever trick I learnt from the instructions in Tilly And The Buttons Coco dress.  Turn the pocket so the right side is up.  Press the bottom edge up by 1.5cm. 


Fold the side edges out flat.  With the the right side up and the bottom edge still folded over, sew along the pressed crease 1.5cm from the edge.  Only sew within the bottom edge fold.

That's a lot harder to explain than it is to do!  Hopefully the photo below will make more sense.  The wrong side fold at the bottom is the bottom edge that has just been pressed over.  The right side bit to the left of the crease is the folded out side edge.  Hopefully you can see where I've stitched in green on the wrong side.


Fold the bottom edge back to the wrong side.  Push the corners out, I found the bottom edge of the seam gauge was just the tool for the job.


Give the pockets a press, and add some buttons for decoration if you want.  I hadn't sewn my buttons on yet when I took this photo.


Pin the pockets where you want them on the skirt, and top stitch along the side and bottom edges 1/4 inch from the edge.
 

And there you have it - some snazzy patch pockets!

Have a great week,

Lynne

36 comments:

  1. Love the patch pockets, will have to try them at some point. The dress is fantastic, it's such a great pattern, and the fabric looks brillaint with it. In the middle of my third Anna currently, all with different skirts

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm very pleased with how the pockets turned out. Isn't Anna such a great pattern, I cut out another one last night.

      Delete
  2. Very cute! You did such an expert job at placing the print well, it's perfect! The pockets are great too :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! It took a while working out how to place the print, and I'm pleased with how it looks.

      Delete
  3. That is such a brilliant fabric! You need to go and play hide and seek in some botanical gardens somewhere! The pockets are great with their buttons.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol! I should do that for a laugh!! Thank you!

      Delete
  4. This is one of MY favorite's you've made too! I must like my retinas burnt out also. :) I love the fabric placement on the bodice! What a fabulous make!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm glad I'm not the only one who likes eyeball-burning fabric!

      Delete
  5. Absolutely stunning dress! Pocket tutorial is just what I needed for a planned olive green military style vintage looking pencil skirt. Many thank you's!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! Glad you liked the how-to, and good luck with your skirt, it sound lovely.

      Delete
  6. You really have a eye for interesting fabrics. This is great, the colours really suit you! I'm also in awe of your pattern matching.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I love this fabric so much, and am very pleased with how it matched on the back.

      Delete
  7. Love how that fabric design looks on the bodice and into the shoulders ;o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I cut the bodice pieces on a single layer, which helped to match the pattern. I forgot to mention that in my post.

      Delete
  8. Gorgeous dress!! The fabric is so stunning and I absolutely adore the patch pockets! Why have I not added patch pockets to any of my dresses?! Such a brilliant idea. Yours look amazing AND they are far more useful than those inseam pockets some patterns tend to have, I often feel like they pull at the dress fabric in weird ways and warp the dress.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I asked myself that very same question! I think that these pockets are so much easier to find than inseam pockets.

      Delete
  9. Absolutely gorgeous dress the fabric is wonderful! My gathered skirt Anna is probably my favourite make too, such a great pattern

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! This is just so easy to wear, I can see more gathered Anna's in my life.

      Delete
  10. Oh me oh my oh PATTERN MATCHING! Spot on, an absolutely gorgeous dress!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! Yeah, I'm pretty pleased with how the matching turned out.

      Delete
  11. You look fine!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Holy cow! Look at that amazing pattern matching on the back! Fantastic job! This dress is just fabulous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm pleased with how the back turned out!

      Delete
  13. This is gorgeous, as always. I really like the way you have rounded the neckline, too. It looks so flattering with the kimono sleeves. Also, I am totally with you on the retina-stretching fabric - usually my gauge is, "Is this kind of ugly?" and then I'm all over it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I had to lower the neckline because the original was too high, and just sort of rounded it! I love the "is this kind of ugly" gauge - so going to use that!!

      Delete
  14. OOOH that fabric is amazing!! I really should give the Anna another chance. I just couldn't get my bust to look normal in it. Needs another muslin I think. I love your patch pockets too. How nice the BHL featured your tute for you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I love this fabric so much! You should definately give Anna another go, because it's such a versatile pattern, and also it would look great on you. I had a few fitting issues with it - too wide at the back neck, shoulder seams in the wrong place, and my usual FBA - but it was worth persevering with it. Oh, and I was so pleased when BHL tweeted my post!!

      Delete
  15. I have to admit, it would have never crossed my mind to use such a print for a dress. But the dress looks amazing on you and I love how you placed that bunch of flowers on the bodice. As always your color choice suits you perfectly. These cute little patch pockets are super sneaky and thanks for posting how to make them. I love patch pockets but somehow never sew them. So next time I will give your tute a try!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I was really pleased with how the print placement worked out on the bodice.

      Delete
  16. This looks amazing! Great job!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for reading my blog! I love reading your comments, so please feel free to leave a comment if you have the time :) Lynne.